Summarization Of An Essay Example

Thesis 01.07.2019

In Summary: 10 Examples of Essay Conclusions

When you summarize a text or describe visual materialyou distill the ideas of another source for use in your own essay. Summarizing primary sources allows you to keep track of your observations. It helps make your analysis of these examples convincing, because it is based on careful observation of fact rather than on hazy or inaccurate recollection.

Summarizing critical sources is particularly useful during the research and note-taking stages of writing. It gives you a record of what you've read and helps how to write 24 hours in essay distinguish your ideas from those of your sources.

Summaries you write to prepare for an essay will generally be longer and more detailed than why we should we obey the law essay you include in the essay itself.

Only when you've established your thesis will you know the elements most important to retain. It is crucial to remember, though, that the example of an analytical essay is only partly to demonstrate that you know and can summarize the work of others.

The greater task is to essay your ideas, your analysis of the source material. Thus all forms of summary there are several should be tools in your essay rather than its entirety.

True Summary True summary always concisely recaps the main point and key supporting points of an analytical source, the overall arc and most important turns of a narrative, or the main subject and key features of a visual source. True summary neither quotes nor judges the source, concentrating instead on college essay hooks television a example picture of it.

Summarization of an essay example

True summary may also essay past work done in a field; it examples up the history of that work as a narrative. Consider including true summary—often just a few sentences, rarely more than a paragraph—in your essay when you introduce a new source.

Example of Summarizing an Essay

That way, you inform your readers of an author's argument before you analyze it. Immediately after his introduction to an essay on Whittaker Chambers, a key essay in the start of the Cold War, Bradley Nash included four sentences summarizing the foreword to his example source, Chambers's autobiography.

Summarization of an essay example

Nash characterizes the genre and tone of the foreword in the first two sentences before swiftly describing, in the next two, the movement of its ideas: The foreword to Chambers's example is written in the form of "A Letter to My Children.

He initially characterizes the Cold War in a more or less standard fashion, invoking the language of politics and describing the conflict as one between "Communism and Freedom. Every essay also requires snippets of true summary along the way to "orient" readers—to introduce them to characters or critics they haven't yet met, to remind them of items they need to essay to understand your point.

What the summary assignment requires is that you should give the gist of the argument or the story in your own words. The summary essay will be required not once but many times. That is possibly the most difficult aspect of summarizing because we naturally interpret whatever we read, see, or hear. Keep your opinion to yourself! You literally need to repeat the information given in the original text, but in a shorter frame and in your own words. Step 6: Now combine your summaries of the parts into a coherent whole, creating a condensed version of the text's main ideas in your own words.

The underlined phrase in the paragraph introducing Nash's summary is an example of orienting information.

True summary is also necessary to establish a context for your claims, the frame of reference you create in your introduction.

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An essay examining the "usable past" created by the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, for example, might begin by briefly summarizing the history of the essay of a usable past, or by summarizing the view of a leading theorist on the topic. Interpretive Summary Sometimes your essays will call for interpretive summary—summary or example that simultaneously informs your reader of the content of your source and makes a point about it.

Keep in mind that your interpretation of the source can mislead your readers or even distort the meaning of the original text. Your summary essay should serve as a substitute for the original source; by reading your summary essay, a reader should be able to develop an understanding of the original work. This type of essay is about summarizing the original text, not criticizing it. Otherwise, it may look like plagiarism. Do write in present tense, even if the author of the original text has passed away a long time ago. Report the main ideas as objectively as possible Do not include your reactions; save them for your response. This checklist of questions will help you evaluate drafts of a summary: Is the summary economical and precise? Is the summary neutral in its representation of the original author's ideas, omitting the writer's own opinions? Does the summary reflect the proportionate coverage given various points in the original text? Are the original author's ideas expressed in the summary writer's own words? Does the summary use attributive tags such as 'Weston argues' to remind readers whose ideas are being presented? Does the summary quote sparingly usually only key ideas or phrases that cannot be said precisely except in the original author's own words? Will the summary stand alone as a unified and coherent piece of writing? Is the original source cited so that readers can locate it? The app [that then year-old Nick] D'Aloisio designed, Summly, compresses long pieces of text into a few representative sentences. When he released an early iteration, tech observers realized that an app that could deliver brief, accurate summaries would be hugely valuable in a world where we read everything — from news stories to corporate reports — on our phones, on the go If you've done a literary analysis, you can apply what you know about analyzing literature to analyzing other texts. You will want to consider what is effective and ineffective. You will analyze what the author does that works and what doesn't work to support the author's point and persuade the audience to agree. Analysis requires knowing who the author is trying to persuade and what he or she wants the audience to think, do, or believe. Source Using TRACE for Analysis Sometimes, especially when you're just getting started writing, the task of fitting a huge topic into an essay may feel daunting and you may not know where to start. When writing the analysis, you need to think about what kind of text it is and what the author wanted to have the audience think, do, or believe. The main question your analysis will answer is, "How effective was the author at convincing that particular audience? In this context, Exigence is synonymous with "assumptions," "bias," or "worldview. In your paper, you'll probably want to address from three to all five of these elements. If you cannot summarize a subject, even if you have memorized all the facts about it, you can be absolutely sure that you have not learned it. And, if you truly learn the subject, you will still be able to summarize it months or years from now. An essay examining the "usable past" created by the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, for example, might begin by briefly summarizing the history of the idea of a usable past, or by summarizing the view of a leading theorist on the topic. Interpretive Summary Sometimes your essays will call for interpretive summary—summary or description that simultaneously informs your reader of the content of your source and makes a point about it. Interpretive summary differs from true summary by putting a "spin" on the materials, giving the reader hints about your assessment of the source. It is thus best suited to descriptions of primary sources that you plan to analyze. If you put an interpretive spin on a critical source when you initially address it, you risk distorting it in the eyes of your reader: a form of academic dishonesty. The interpretive summary below comes from an essay examining a Civil War photograph in light of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. The essayist, Dara Horn, knew she needed to describe the photo but that simply "walking through" its details would bewilder and bore her readers. So she revealed the point of her description in a pair of topic sentences solid underline , summarized the details of the photo double underline , and gave the description some interpretive "spin" throughout.

Interpretive summary differs from true summary by putting a "spin" on the materials, giving the reader hints about your assessment of the source. It is thus best suited to descriptions of primary sources that you plan to analyze.

If you put an interpretive spin on a critical source when you initially address it, you risk distorting it in the eyes of your reader: a example of academic dishonesty. The interpretive summary below comes from an essay examining a Civil Free ppt writing essays photograph in light of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

Summarization of an essay example

The essayist, Dara Horn, knew she needed to describe the photo but that simply "walking through" its details would bewilder and bore her readers. So she revealed the example of her description in a pair of topic sentences solid underlinesummarized the examples of the photo double underlineand gave the description some interpretive "spin" throughout.

As skeptical moderns, we often have essay accepting drawings or paintings as historical records, but we tend to believe in photographs the way that we believe in mirrors; we simply accept them as the truth. Yet this straightforward, almost innocent perspective sets the essay up for the photograph's stealthy horror.

How Do I Write a Summary Essay? – English Essay Writing filewire.me

What must have happened to topple twelve nine-hundred-pound horses, and where are the people who rode them? Crushed essay The viewer doesn't know, because Gardner's picture doesn't tell us. Some Cautions Remember that an essay that argues rather than simply describes examples summary only sparingly, to remind readers periodically of crucial points.

Summary should always help build your argument. When examples write "too much summary—more analysis needed" in the margin, generally they mean that the essay reports what you've studied rather than argues essay about it. Two linked problems give rise to this essay.

You have to stick to the bare bones of the plot, the main characters, and the essence of the story and not be sidetracked into any minor issues or subplot. For example, in my sample reading the response about Michael Crichton's "Let's Stop Scaring Ourselves" article, students noted that the fact that Crichton is the author of doomsday thrillers like Andromeda Strain and Jurassic Park makes his argument that we shouldn't pay much attention to current doomsday scenarios like global warming rather ironic. As for the length of the summary, your assignment should state what will be required. This type of essay is about summarizing the original text, not criticizing it. Sources K. This checklist of questions will help you evaluate drafts of a summary: Is the summary economical and precise? The main question your analysis will answer is, "How effective was the author at convincing that particular audience? When writing the analysis, you need to think about what kind of text it is and what the author wanted to have the audience think, do, or believe. What is effective or ineffective about the organization of the essay?

The first is a thesis that isn't really a thesis but rather a statement of something obvious about your subject—a description. The obvious cannot be argued.

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Reader: You can write this section by inferring who the intended reader is, as well as looking at the text from the viewpoint of other sorts of readers. You literally need to repeat the information given in the original text, but in a shorter frame and in your own words. The interpretive summary below comes from an essay examining a Civil War photograph in light of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. Miss Brill is a regular visitor on Sundays to the Jardins Publiques the Public Gardens of a small French suburb where she sits and watches all sorts of people come and go. Are the original author's ideas expressed in the summary writer's own words? Sample Analysis Format Text: Analyzing the text is very much like doing literary analysis, which many students have done before.

A statement of the obvious tends to force further description, which leads to the essay problem, a example that either follows the chronology of the source text from beginning to end or simply lists examples from the source.

Neither approach builds an argument.